Your resume font doesn’t really matter…

Or does it?

Of all the things that you should be worried about, the resume font is probably at the last of the list. But yes, it does affect (just slightly) the interviewer’s impression of you.

So what font should you be using for your resume?

The Best Resume Font

My advice? Use the default Microsoft Word font – Calibri.

And here’s why…

Because if you are writing a standard resume, then the resume font is not going to be the reason to whether you get the interview. So rather than spending an hour or so researching and trying out different fonts, just use the default and get started. (Or you can see some examples below first)

Realistically, you just need to choose a resume font that is professional and relatively easy to read. In fact, most sans-serif or serif typeface is fine.

Common Resume Fonts

The 5 most popular resume fonts are Calibri, Arial, Times New Roman, Tahoma, and Helvetica. But if you want to be different, instead of using a standardized font throughout the resume, you can also use 2 different fonts separately for your resume header and body (see example below).

Font Comparison
Arial A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog
Comic Sans MS A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog
Helvetica A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog
Tahoma A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog
Trebuchet MS A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog
Verdana A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog
Book Antiqua A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog
Georgia A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog
Times New Roman A quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog

Here are a few examples using different resume font:

Resume Title – Trebuchet MS

Does it look surprising good to have a sans-serif typeface for your resume header and a serif typeface for your resume body? And by the way, I am using Georgia for this. I like the Trebuchet MS + Georgia combination. It helps to give my resume a serious but not too serious feel. Unlike this:

Resume Title – Times New Roman

This paragraph is also in Times New Roman (TNR). Unlike the other 2 examples, the paragraph is in 14px because it looks too small in 12px. TNR is a classic font for the resume to give a formal look and feel. But like I said, I prefer something not so serious. This is too formal for my liking.

Resume Title – Arial

What do you think when both the header and the paragraph are in Arial? It’s clean, simple and without any additional decoration. Arial is also another popular font for resume due to its simple, no-frills style. But as you can see, a different font portrays a different personality, a different feeling of you.

Feelings of Font

The resume font is, in fact, part of the resume design. It’s about how you would like to be perceived. Every font has its own associated personality. So choose a font that is reflective of your personality, in line with your profession and matches your resume style.

And here’s how I feel towards these fonts:

Associated Personality Suggested Font
Formal, Reliable Times New Roman, Georgia
Elegant, Personal, Affectionate Bradley Hand ITC, Lucida Handwriting
Mature, Calm, Clean Arial, Tahoma, Verdana
Stylish, Fashionable ITC Avant Garde Gothic, Century Gothic
Expressive, Confident Egyptienne, Rockwell